About

About Higher Heights Leadership Fund

Higher Heights Leadership Fund, a 501(c)(3), is building a national civic engagement infrastructure and network to strengthen Black women’s leadership capacity.  Higher Heights Leadership Fund is investing in a long-term strategy to expand and support Black women’s leadership pipeline at all levels and strengthen their civic participation beyond just Election Day.

This work requires a multi-year, multi-million dollar investment to increase Black women’s leadership.  Higher Heights Leadership Fund is developing the foundation to achieve this goal through four key components: capacity building, grassroots organizing, research, and convenings.

  1. Capacity Building: Develop a national network of Black women and other supporters.  Partner with other organizations on a variety of initiatives including, but not limited to, research, training, and convenings.
  2. Grassroots Organizing:  Educate and organize Black to engage and participate in the public debate and social action to improve their civic participation and leadership.
  3. Research: Develop and publish research on Black women’s political leadership and electoral engagement.
  4. Convening: Host salon conversations, tele-town halls and roundtable discussions focused on harnessing Black women’s political power and leadership potential. 
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Voices. Votes. Leadership.

Status of Black Women In American Politics

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Our Programs

Get involved. Check out one of our many programs that we operate in conjunction with Higher Heights for America such as our Sunday Brunch Series. 

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NewsRoom

Urgency and Optimism: Chisholm's Legacy and the Status of Black Women in American Politics Today
By Glynda C. Carr & Kelly Dittmar, Ph.D.

Today would have marked the 91st birthday of an American trailblazer. Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm (D-NY) approached public service with unmatched zeal and urgency. She became the first Black woman elected to the U.S. Congress in 1968, and the first Black person and first woman to win delegate votes at a major party presidential convention in 1972.

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